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GRIT Multigenre Miniatures Rules – Basic Rules
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A system of rules which you may use for tactical gameplay with 25 to 28 mm miniatures where each figure represents one person or creature.
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Rules Design, Development, Writing & Editing
Kevin Davies

Development, Production & Editing Assistance
Mark Haskins, Daniel Ksenych, Barry Orme

Playtesters, Readers, Additional Ideas & Suggestions
Many thanks to the following people for their time and honest comments:
Sue Benger, Mark Haskins, Dave Hudson, Daniel Ksenych, Brian Laxon, Greg Morey, Barry Orme, James Quinn.

Art Direction, Layout & Production
Kevin Davies

Dedicated to the ‘kid’ in each of us.

GRIT Multigenre Miniatures Rules is published by:
Peregrine
40 Seymour Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M4J 3T4
Phone: (416) 461-9884
Fax: (416) 461-4031
Email: peregrine@peregrine-net.com
Web: http://www.peregrine-net.com

GRIT™ Multigenre Miniatures Rules is copyright © 1994 – 2003 Kevin Davies
Second Edition, January 2003, Electronic Edition. Printed in Canada.
First Edition, August 1999, Printed in the United States of America.
Stock Number: PGN 3201

All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any other information storage an retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Permission is hereby granted to the end user of these rules to make one copy per player for the sole purpose of gameplay. It is strictly forbidden for the user to sell these rules without prior written agreement from Kevin Davies.

Writers and Artists: Peregrine is always interested in looking at the work of new and established talent. Please send us a résumé and photocopies (never originals) of your best work and if possible, in the style that you would like to produce for us. Submissions will be filed and not returned.


C O N T E N T S

GRIT Basic Rules
Introduction

1.0 What You Need to Play
1.1 Dice & How They Are Used in GRIT
1.2 Gameplay Tip: Using Dice to Achieve 'Instant' Results

2.0 GRIT Gameplay Setup
2.1 Pre-Game Decisions

3.0 GRIT Character Basics
3.1 Character Generation — Point Allocation System
3.2 Non-Player Character (NPC) Generation
3.3 Non-Humanoid Wild Animals, Creatures, & Monsters
3.4 Basic Character Templates

4.0 Objects — Weapons, Armor & Devices
4.1 Weapons
4.2 Armor, Shields & Inanimate Objects

5.0 Grit Gameplay Basics
5.1 Gametime — Rounds & Turns
5.2 Action Initiative
5.3 Turn Sequence & Action Resolution
5.4 Character Actions

6.0 Combat
6.1 Line-of-Sight (LOS)
6.2 Getting Within Range
6.3 Making an Attack
6.4 The Defender Attempts to Dodge

APPENDIX: GRIT Sample Character Templates


Introduction

GRIT is a system of rules designed for tactical gameplay with 25 — 28 mm miniatures where each figure represents one person or creature. The rules can be used for scenarios where each player employs a single miniature, a tactical squad, or battle groups with reinforcements. Distances are presented in the form of inches with the scale 1" [2.5 cm] on a table-top or playing surface (if using Adventure Areas or other interior gameplay surface this is divided into 1" squares or hexes), equaling 5' [1.5 m] — all measurements listed in feet are relative to scale of the miniatures. GRIT may be used for solitary play or for two or more players — a Gamemaster (referee) is optional (employed for ‘double-blind’ games where players only place miniatures on the play area when they are in the Line of Sight of opposing figures).

GRIT was developed in response to a demand for miniatures rules that balance fast setup and gameplay with unlimited Action alternatives and roleplay style Characters that can develop their capabilities. GRIT Scenarios can encompass any genre or time period and make use of any style of miniature figure or terrain element. Victory Conditions, Scenario Complications, and level of realism and detail can be as simple or complex as desired.

Players have the option of basing Characters on a template, an existing roleplay Character, or generating an original Character with unique Stats. Characters can attempt any desired Action, and have the capacity to revive from unconsciousness, heal, and use any weapon or object.

GRIT Basic & Advanced Rules
This document provides Basic Character Generation and Gameplay Rules up front so you can quickly read what the essentials you need to begin play. GRIT Advanced Rules, providing increased realism and detail, is available as a PDF document on CD for just $10 (US funds money order made out to ‘Peregrine’; shipping is included in the price). You can use it digitally or print it out as needed. Your support will enable us to develop more great products for your enjoyment.

Extra Material Contained in GRIT Advanced & Optional Rules:
7.0 Detailed Scenario Generation

7.1 Establishing the Scenario
7.2 The Gameplay Area

8.0 GRIT Character Optional Rules
8.1 Non-Character Figures (NCF)
8.2 Character Conversion — Using a Roleplay Character
8.3 Healing Rate
8.4 Character Fatigue
8.5 Lucky Break
8.6 GRIT Trait System
8.7 GRIT Skill System
8.8 GRIT Spellcasting System
8.9 Character Improvement

9.0 Objects — Weapons, Armor & Devices Optional Rules
9.1 Weapon & Device Creation System
9.2 Inanimate Object Damage Resistance Value
9.3 Transportation Creation
9.4 Transportation Operation & Control

10.0 Grit Gameplay Advanced & Optional Rules
10.1 Competing Character Initiatives
10.2 Action Conditions
10.3 Undetected Movement
10.4 Random Direction Matrix (Roll 1d10)
10.5 Unexpected Events
10.6 Special Terrain/Environment Effects
10.7 Random Encounters

11.0 Combat Optional Rules
11.1 Defensive (Out-of-Turn) Attack
11.2 Combat Modifier: Specific Hit Location & Damage
11.3 Attacking With Multi-Shot Weapons (High-Tech Scenarios)
11.4 Attacking With Crewed Weapons
11.5 Combat (Action) Roll Modifiers — Environmental & Defensive
11.6 Combat (Action) Roll Modifiers — Attack & Damage
11.7 Combat with NPCs
11.8 NPC Random Movement
11.9 Character Morale
11.10 Creature Morale
11.11 Command
11.12 Military Group Combat
11.13 Character Reinforcements


1.0 What You Need To Play

All you need is a two ten-sided dice (d10), a play area (either Adventure Areas and/or any appropriate game surface), a pencil, a piece of paper (upon which you’ll describe one or more Characters), and miniature figures (or other objects) to represent your Characters. If playing in an exterior setting, without the use of a 1" grid or hex surface, a ruler, measuring tape, or marked string will aid in measuring distances. Some coins or tokens will help you to keep track of each Character’s Action Points.

1.1 Dice & How They Are Used in GRIT

1d10: a single ten-sided die, rolled to determine results or make decisions ranging from 1 to 10 or 10% to 100% at 10% intervals. (Note that some d10 use a number ‘10’ to represent ten, while others use a ‘0’.)

2d10: two single ten-sided dice, rolled together and their results added to determine a ‘bell-curve’ ranging from 2 to 20. Numbers toward the center of the range are more likely to be rolled. (Note that some d10 use a number ‘10’ to represent ten, while others use a ‘0’.)

1d100 (2d10): used when you need to determine decisions or probabilities of a 1% to 100% percentile spread (i.e., a ‘percentage chance’ that something will occur). However, since a one hundred-sided die is not physically practical, a ‘percentile roll’ is made using two ten-sided die (2d10). The player designates one die as ‘high’ and the other ‘low’; the high die represents the tens column in the 1 to 100 number (for example, 0 or 10 = 100, 9 = 90, 8 = 80...), and the ‘low’ die represents the ones column (for example, 0 or 10 = nil, 9 = 9, 8 = 8...). A roll of 0:0 or 10:10 equals 100%.

1.2 Gameplay Tip: Using Dice to Achieve ‘Instant’ Results
It may occasionally be necessary to determine various quantities or probable results during gameplay. Put the dice to work for you and obtain instant results. Some examples follow; feel free to invent your own.


2.0 GRIT Gameplay Setup

A Game of GRIT can take as little or as much time to setup as you like. At its most simplest, designate a play area (e.g., a table top or a section of floor), decide upon a Victory Condition (i.e., what each force must accomplish to be declared the winner), divide up the available miniature figures, and using templates to define individual Characters, have at it. To help you establish more detailed Scenarios, the following text is provided.

2.1 Pre-Game Decisions
A game of GRIT begins with the players making a number of decisions:

Decided by all players together:
1. What is the Scenario and Victory Condition(s)?
a. The Scenario is comprised of the setting, the overall situation, and the challenge(s) that the Characters must overcome. Just make something up that sounds reasonable and provides an excuse for the action about to happen.
b. The Victory Condition is the specific task that a force must overcome in order to be declared a ‘winner’ of the Scenario.

2. What constitutes the Gameplay Area and significant physical features?
a. The Gameplay Area could be a table-top, a section of a floor, a miniatures playmat or a network of rooms and corridors built from Adventure Areas
, etc.
b. The Physical Features of the Gameplay Area could be specific walls, hills, trees, rocks, buildings and other structures; colored terrain variations and indicated hills, rivers, train tracks etc.

3. How many miniature figures will each player begin with and how many reinforcements (if any) are available?
Initial Miniatures Available:

We recommend that you initially begin with 1 to 3 miniatures each and gradually expand to a squad of about 5; unless you have mastered play with this number, you will find large battles slow. Only use large numbers of miniatures and include reinforcements for long battles and complex scenarios.

4. What Special Conditions* and Resources* apply and/or are available to the setting and the opposing forces.
Initial Miniature Figure Setup:
Begin with all Characters off the game surface unless agreed otherwise by all players, or stipulated by a pregenerated Scenario or the Gamemaster. As each Character takes their turn they will enter through a designated entry point (as agreed by the players, determined during the play area setup process, or as stipulated by a pregenerated Scenario or Gamemaster).

5. Are any Advanced or Optional Rules being used and if so which?*

Decided by each player individually:
1. Define the 6 Stats that comprise each Character employed in the game (each miniature figure represents one Character); record them on a Character Sheet for that miniature.

2. If using any Advanced Rules, define any additional qualities for each Character.*

3. Set up all participating miniatures for the start of the game; agreed Setup Conditions* may influence the possible initial placement positions.

*GRIT Advanced Rules provides more details and/or random generation tables for these items (see 7.0).


3.0 GRIT Character Basics

Each miniature used in the game is represented as a ‘Character’ and defined by his or her ‘Stats’: numeric representations of the physical, mental, and supernatural characteristics that facilitate their simulated actions in the game. Details about each Character are recorded on a Character Sheet for that miniature.

There are three types of miniature Character: a) a Player Character (PC), used by a player and possessing uniquely defined Stats; b) a Non-Player Character (NPC), used by either a player or a Gamemaster to represent a potentially significant Character with unique Stats, not (as yet) involved in the pursuit of the Scenario Victory Condition (e.g., a creature or ‘walk-on’, 3.2); c) a Non-Character Figure (NCF), used by a player as a support figure (i.e., cannon fodder, a civilian, or a non-hostile animal) and possessing ‘averaged’ Stats (see Advanced Rules, 8.1).

To establish a Character, you can a) use a pre-generated Character Template with preset numeric values for each Stat, b) modify a Character Template to produce a more distinct Character, c) produce a unique Character by designating each Stat yourself, using a Point Allocation System, or d) convert an existing Character from a roleplay game for use with GRIT (detailed in the Advanced Rules, see 8.2).

3.1 Character Generation – Point Allocation System
For each Character a player has 30 Stat Points (SP) to divide between their 6 Stats: Action Points (AP), Health Points (HP), Body Value (BOD), Mind Value (MND), Mystic Value (MYS), and Race (RCE). At least 1 SP must be invested into each Stat and no more than 9 SP may be invested in Body Value, Mind Value, and Mystic Value.

3.1.1 Action Points (AP)
The more Action Points you have, the greater number of Actions your Character can take (or distance travel) per round of gameplay. Example: for your PC to advance 1" [5'], you must spend 1 AP (see Action Point Cost Table, 5.4.1).

Tip: Use pennies, coins or tokens to keep track of each Character’s AP, shifting them from a ‘banked’ pile to a ‘spent’ pile as AP are expended; all expended AP are shifted back to the banked pile at the beginning of each new round.

3.1.2 Health Points (HP)
Health Points determine the amount of physical and mental fatigue or blows a Character can endure before passing into unconsciousness, and eventually death. Health Points may be temporarily ‘lost’ or reduced through mental or physical combat; this is known as ‘taking Damage’. A Character must possess 1 HP in order to perform any physical Action.

Tip: Use pennies, coins or tokens to keep track of each Character’s HP, shifting them back and forth from a ‘healthy’ pile to a ‘damaged’ pile as HP are reduced and regained.

3.1.2.1 Unconsciousness & Death
1. Fast Play: When a Character’s HP total is reduced to zero, they pass into unconsciousness. For fast-play games or Non-Character Figures (see 8.1) and Non-Player Characters (see 3.2), this may be considered the moment of death for the miniature figure.

2. Detailed Play: For more detailed, longer-play games or campaigns, the following unconsciousness and death rules can be used:

1. The blow that reduces the Character’s HP to zero will not lower it below zero; any extra Damage from the assault is not counted.

2. Once unconscious, a Character may only attempt to regain consciousness once per round , by making a successful Mind Roll. Once a PC has regained consciousness they may ‘rest’ and heal HP (at their Healing Rate determined by their Body Value, see Healing Rate 8.3). While a ‘conscious’ Character can ‘think’ with zero HP they may not resume bodily activity until their HP total is replenished to 1 HP or more.

3. If additional assaults are inflicted upon a PC with zero HP, the Damage causes a further reduction of HP lowering it to a negative value; note this number on the PC’s Character Sheet.

4. When a PC’s negative HP value equals the same number as their normal positive HP total, the player must make a Mind Roll each round for the PC to remain alive; failure will result in the death of the Character – they have lost the will to live. Alternatively, if a Specific Hit-Location system is in use and the Character has sustained wounds sufficient to determine that death has occurred (e.g., decapitation) no further Mind Roll can sustain their life.

3.1.3 Body Value (BOD)
Body Value represents a Character’s strength, dexterity, fitness, rate of healing, sensory perception, and capacity to do physical tasks. When you want your Character to attempt a physical Action (e.g., swing a sword or jump over a pit or see, hear, smell, taste, or feel something), you must make a Body Roll, rolling 1d10 equal to or less than your established Body Value.

3.1.4 Mind Value (MND)
Mind Value represents a Character’s intelligence, willpower, and ability to perform mental tasks and think clearly under stress. When you want your PC to attempt a mental Action (e.g., determine whether they notice something, know something, can reason something out, resist a mental or supernatural influence [Skill or Ability]), you must make a Mind Roll, rolling 1d10 equal to or less than their established Mind Value.

3.1.5 Mystic Value (MYS)
Mystic Value represents a Character’s sensitivity to supernatural forces, their aptitude for supernatural abilities (such as psionics and spellcasting – to be detailed in a future supplement), along with how lucky they are (see Lucky Break 8.5). When you want a Character to attempt a supernatural Action (e.g., use a supernatural device or employ an established supernatural ability), you must make a Mystic Roll, rolling 1d10 equal to or less than their established Mystic Value.

3.1.6 Race (or Species, RCE)
Race represents your PC’s physiological and cultural origins (e.g., Human, Dwarvish, Alien, etc.). If creating an Alien, Monster, or Creature you may choose to employ the word ‘Species’ instead of Race. If you choose not to designate a specific Race for your Character, it will be assumed that they are Human (or if a creature, a natural animal), requiring a Race Value of 1 (the minimum).

3.2 Non-Player Character Generation
What’s an adventure without a few nasties lurking about. A Non-Player Character (NPC) represents any creature or humanoid adversary that the Character encounters that is not directly part of an opponent’s force. An assortment of creatures (including pets, mounts, draft, and pack animals), monsters, and hostile humanoids can be created prior to the start of the game, or on the spur of the moment during gameplay as necessary (see Random Encounters, 10.7).

The Stats that define NPCs are the same as those defining PCs. To quickly determine the Stats for an NPC, roll 1d10 for each Stat, then apply +3 to the Stat that you think best reflects the NPC’s nature (maximum ‘9’ per Stat); if the NPC is humanoid, reduce or increase the Stat values as you like until the total is equal to 30. (Don’t forget to give NPCs fear-inducing names like Doug the Destroyer, or Clive the Cleaver, or Bert the Bad).

3.3 Non-Humanoid Wild Animals, Creatures & Monsters
If creating a Wild Animal, Monster or Alien Creature that will be engaging Human(oid) forces (e.g., Humans, Elves, Dwarves, Humanoid Aliens) in combat, the same total number of points that the Humanoid forces use to purchase all their weapons, armor and equipment is granted to each Animal/Creature/Monster Character(s). If you want a less deadly confrontation, split the points between all the non-Humanoid opponents. If the non-Humanoids are ‘intelligent’, some or all of the pointsmay be applied toward the purchase of weapons, armor, and ‘equipment’ at the same cost as the Humanoid forces. Alternatively, a non-Humanoid may apply a +1 point bonus to their Body or Race Stat for every 300 points all other players spend on weapons, armor and equipment.


4.0 Objects — Weapons, Armor & Devices

While a Character may decide to run into battle naked, most will probably want some sort of protective garment between them and the nasty end of an opponent’s weapon. They’ll also likely want to attack with something other than their bare hands. The weapons, armor, devices, and objects deemed significant possessed by a Character at the start of play are acquired through the investment of Object Points (OP) – other items may be acquired freely (e.g., from the hands for dead opponents) during gameplay.

Prior to the start of play, the players should agree on the number of Object Points granted to each Character. These OP will be divided by the player as they like between weapons, armor, and any other available devices or objects. An average scenario might allow anything from 10 to 1000 OP (option: roll 1d10 x 100 OP). The higher the total number of Object Points that the players agree to grant their Characters, the more lethal the scenario.

If the players agree, objects and devices that are not weapons or armor can be simply granted to the Characters as applicable for the scenario. Any devices or substances which affect Stats (e.g., Drugs which replenish lost HP), must cost OP to obtain.

4.1 Weapons
Weapons are any hand-held or propelled objects which have the potential to inflict damage upon a living opponent or inanimate object (i.e., everything from a lemon meringue pie to a tactical nuke). An unarmed attack(punch, kick, or body blow) inflicts 1d10 ÷2 Impact Damage (always round down). Unless otherwise stated (via a Specific Hit Location, see 11.2), punches are assumed aimed for the face while kicks and other blows are to the torso (consider the effects of Armor for each individual defender). Any attack that successfully hits will always inflict a minimum of 1 HP Damage.

All weapons will include a Range (RNG), an Attacks per Turn (A/T) (and AP Cost), a Damage Value (DV) and an Object Point (OP) Cost; armor will list a Damage Resistance Value (DRV), which also serves as its Object Point Cost.

Look down the list of Weapons Templates below and select a desired (and setting applicable) weapon that you have sufficient OP to acquire. After choosing a weapon you may increase its Damage Value by investing any remaining OP (1 OP = 1 DV). Keep in mind, however, you may also want armor for your PC (see 4.2). All Ranges listed below are ‘effective-accurate’ ranges; maximum weapon Ranges are typically (but not always) three to five times greater.

4.1.1 Weapons: Melee / Hand-Held – Pre-Industrial Tech
. Weapon Type Range
(1" = 5')
Attacks Per Turn
(AP Cost)
Damage Value
HP Per Hit
Ammo Other Notes OP
Cost
1. Unarmed: Hand/Foot/Body 1" (Adjacent) 3, (1 AP per Attack) 1d10 ÷2 HP n/a . n/a
2. Club (One-Handed, Baton) 1" (Adjacent) 2, (1 AP per Attack) 1d10 –2 HP n/a . 7
3. Club (Two-Handed, Bat) 1" (Adjacent) 1, (1 AP per Attack) 1d10 –1 HP n/a . 4
4. Knife <12" (One-Handed) 1" (Adjacent) 2, (1 AP per Attack) 1d10 HP n/a . 9
5. Machete >12" (One-Handed) 1" (Adjacent) 1, (1 AP per Attack) 1d10 +1 HP n/a . 6
6. Short Sword (One-Handed) 1" (Adjacent) 1, (1 AP per Attack) 1d10 +2 HP n/a . 7
7. Long Sword (One-Handed) 1" (Adjacent) 1, (2 AP per Attack) 1d10 +4 HP n/a . 7
8. Axe (One-Handed) 1" (Adjacent) 1, (2 AP per Attack) 1d10 +3 HP n/a . 6
9. Axe (Two-Handed) 1" (Adjacent) 1, (3 AP per Attack) 1d10 +6 HP n/a . 8
10. Halberd (Two-Handed) 1" (Adjacent) 1, (4 AP per Attack) 1d10 +9 HP n/a . 10

4.1.2 Weapons: Range / Missile & Projectile – Pre-Industrial Tech
. Weapon Type Range
(1" = 5')
Attacks Per Turn
(AP Cost)
Damage Value
HP Per Hit
Ammo Other Notes OP
Cost
1. Dagger, Throwing
(One-Handed)
2", Thrown 1, (1 AP per Attack) 1d10 HP n/a . 6
2. Spear
(Stabbing & Throwing)
4", Thrown 1, (2 AP per Attack) 1d10 +2 HP n/a Stabbing Range: 1" 7
3. Combustible Device
(Burning Oil)
10", Thrown 1, (1 AP per Attack) 2d10 HP n/a Splash Radius: 2"
Duration: 2 Rounds
25
4. Sling & Slingstones 40", Shooting 2, (1 AP per Attack) 1d10 HP 1 Shot . 26
5. Bow (Short) & Arrows 60", Shooting 1, (2 AP per Attack) 1d10 +1 HP 1 Shot . 35
6. Bow (Long) & Arrows 90", Shooting 1, (3 AP per Attack) 1d10 +2 HP 1 Shot . 50
7. Crossbow (Medium) 60", Shooting 1, (4 AP per Attack) 1d10 +1 HP 1 Shot . 33
8. Ballista (Stone/Javelin)
(Crew 2+)*
200", Hurling 1, (4–16 AP per Attack**) 3d10 HP 1 Shot 20–60 seconds per Shot;
Max Hurl: 10–60 lbs
112
9. Light Catapult
(Crew 5+)*
400", Hurling 1, (4–16 AP per Attack**) 4d10 HP 1 Shot 20–60 seconds per Shot;
Max Hurl: 10–500 lbs
217
10. Heavy Catapult
(Crew 8+)*
600", Hurling 1, (24–96 AP per Attack**) 6d10 HP 1 Shot 2–3 minutes per Shot;
Max Hurl: 100–2000 lbs
327

*.....Crew listed is the minimum; the maximum crew is 4x the minimum.
**
...For each multiple of the minimum crew value assisting to operate the weapon, reduce the listed
......AP Cost by 25% of the maximum (e.g., Ballista: Crew 2 = 16 AP; Crew 8 = 4 AP).

4.1.3 Weapons: Range / Missile & Projectile – Early-Industrial Tech
. Weapon Type Range
(1" = 5')
Attacks Per Turn
(AP Cost)***
Damage Value
HP Per Hit
Ammo Other Notes OP
Cost
1. Arquebus
(Early Firearm)
40", Shooting 1, (24–36 AP per Attack) 3d10 HP 1 Shot 2–3 minutes per Shot. 32
2. Musket
(Early Firearm)
80", Shooting 1, (24–36 AP per Attack) 3d10 HP 1 Shot 2–3 minutes per Shot. 52
3. Rifle
(Western)
200", Shooting 1, (3–4 AP per Attack) 1d10 +2 HP 15 Shots 3–4 seconds per Shot. 119
4. Revolver
(Western)
30", Shooting 1, (2–4 AP per Attack) 1d10 HP 6 Shots 2–4 seconds per Shot. 24
5. Cannon: Light Field Gun (Crew 2+)* 400", Shooting 1, (12–84 AP per Attack**) 5d10 HP 1 Shot 1–2 minutes per Shot. 222
6. Cannon: Heavy Gun (Crew 3+)* 600", Shooting 1, (15–60 AP per Attack**) 10d10 HP 1 Shot 2–5 minutes per Shot. 347
7. Cannon: Bombard (Crew 4+)* 800", Shooting 1, (30–120 AP per Attack**) 20d10 HP 1 Shot 5–10 minutes per Shot. 497
8. Dynamite Explosion
(8oz TNT)
0", Placed
18", Thrown
1, (3 AP per Attack)
(If 'delay' employed add applicable AP)
3d10 HP n/a Blast Radius: 4"; Conditions (3): 10% Chance of Fire, Structure Unstable, & Cave-in. 32

*......Crew listed is the minimum; the maximum crew is 4x the minimum.
**
....For each multiple of the minimum crew value assisting to operate the weapon, reduce the listed
.......AP Cost by 25% of the maximum (e.g., Ballista: Crew 2 = 16 AP; Crew 8 = 4 AP).
***
..The numeric range listed for AP Cost and the 'time per shot' represents a variation
.......in the available type, size, and condition of weapons.

4.1.4 Weapons: Range / Missile & Projectile – High Tech
. Weapon Type Range
(1" = 5')
Attacks Per Turn
(AP Cost)
Damage Value
HP Per Hit
Ammo Other Notes OP
Cost
1. Shotgun 40", Shooting 1, (2 AP per Attack) 2d10 +3 HP 7 Shots . 38
2. Hand Gun:
Automatic Pistol
60", Shooting 1, (1 AP per Attack) 1d10 +3 HP 10 Shots . 48
3. Sub-Machinegun 100", Shooting 1–10 (Burst),
(1 AP per Attack)
1d10 +3 HP 30 Shots . 116
4. Automatic Assault Rifle 300", Shooting 1 or 3 (Burst),
(1 AP per Attack)
2d10 HP 30 Shots . 102
5. Light Machinegun 500", Shooting 1–30 (Full Auto),
(1 AP per Attack)
2d10 HP 30 Shots . 306
6. Flame-Thrower (Napalm) 30", Shooting 1, (3 AP per Attack) 10d10 HP 5 Shots Radius of Ignited Area: 2"; Burn Duration:15 Rounds; Condition: Target Ignites; 80% chance continued burning after Duration. 120
7. Grenade Launcher (& Grenade) 240", Shooting 1, (4 AP per Attack) 3d10 HP 1 Shot Radius of Blast on Impact: 6". 144
8. Grenade: Smoke 18", Thrown 1, (2 AP per Attack) 1 HP;
Smoke
n/a Radius of Smoke-Obscured Area: 15"; Smoke Duration: 10 Rounds; Condition: Visibility reduced within affected area to 1d10" per Round. 73
9. Grenade: Stun (Flash-Bang) 24", Thrown 1, (2 AP per Attack) 1 HP;
Stun
n/a Radius of Incapaciting Effect: 6"; Flash Duration: 1 Round; Condition: Target must make a successful Mind Roll or be incapacitated for 3 Rounds. 31
10. Grenade: Fragmentation 20", Thrown 1, (2 AP per Attack) 3d10 HP n/a Radius of Blast & Fragment Dispersal: 8". 39
11. Grenade: Blast/Concussion 20", Thrown 1, (2 AP per Attack) 4d10 HP n/a Radius of Blast Effect: 2". Condition: Target must make a successful Mind Roll or be incapacitated for 1 Round. 33

4.2 Armor, Shields & Inanimate Objects
Armor is any substance worn on the body to protect it from impact or other damage; heavy fabric, animal hide, wood, horn, bone, leather hardened in boiling wax, woven cord, and metal in various forms. A ‘shield’ may be considered to be any hand-held or self-standing (i.e., it can be dropped or caused to fall over) object of any material which is placed between a PC and a weapon. Both shields and armor function by absorbing (i.e., nullifying) Damage which would otherwise be inflicted on the PC.

4.2.1 How Armor & Shields Reduce Damage
The effectiveness of an armor garment or shield is determined by its Damage Resistance Value (DRV), which designates the amount of HP Damage absorbed by the material per combat round (shield DRV is added to armor DRV). The flesh of a normal human is considered to have a Damage Resistance Value of zero (i.e., no DRV); any Damage inflicted upon the exposed skin will result in wounding.

Each 1 OP invested will grant the Character 1 point of DRV (i.e., 1 HP of Damage protection). After choosing an armor garment you may increase its DRV or produce a Shield by investing any remaining OP (1 OP = 1 DRV).

4.2.2 Damaging a Character Wearing Armor
Should more Damage be applied toward a PC than the DRV total afforded by what they’re wearing and/or the shield they’re holding, they must reduce their HP by the remaining amount. Additionally, for every 5 HP of Impact Damage that’s absorbed by armor, 1 HP is applied as Bruise Damage (reducing the Character’s HP total). For example if a PC takes 8 points of Damage and is wearing a garment with a DRV of 6 then the armor absorbs 6 HP while 2 HP pass through to the PC as Impact Damage, plus an additional 1 point of Bruise Damage (since 5+ HP was inflicted on the garment).

4.2.3 Armor Garments
Provided below are examples of armor garments along with their damage-absorbing Damage Resistance Value/Stat Point Cost. Spend the OP you want to obtain the armor garment with the DRV you want. Additional armor and shields may be acquired during adventures or purchased with Experience Points after completing an adventure.

If a Character is wearing assorted small pieces of armor or protective garments fabricated from different material types, estimate the ‘average’ DRV of the combined protection worn and use that as the Character’s overall DRV. If any armor is fabricated from materials not listed below, estimate the appropriate DRV for the material type used.

4.2.3.1 Armor (Protective) Garments Table
.Stat Point Cost & DRV (Damage Resistance Value) . Armor Garment Material Type & Thickness
. 1 . Light Fabric (Street Clothes)
. 2 – 3 . Heavy Fabric (Canvas Cloth)
. 4 – 8 . Soft, Dressed Leather (Thin 1/16", Thick 1/8")
. 6 – 12 . Padded, Quilted Garment (Thin 1", Thick 2")
. 10 – 15 . Heavy Layered Leather (Thin 3/16", Thick 1/4")
. 20 – 25 – 45 . Scale Mail Armor (Wood, Horn, Metal)
. 40 – 50 – 65 . Chainmail Armor (Single, Banded, Double)
. 55 – 75 – 100 . Metal Plate Armor (Laminated 1/32", Medium Sheet 1/16", Thick Sheet 1/8")
. 25 – 35 – 45 . Resistweave Garment (Light, Medium, Heavy; high-tech material)
. 50 – 60 – 70 . Kevlar Armor (Light, Medium, Heavy; high-tech material)



5.0 Grit Gameplay Basics

The following rules explain Character movement and actions. Some rules are designated ‘Optional’; if all players agree prior to the start of the game, specific Rule Options can be used to improve gameplay as desired. Where applicable, round down die rolls.

5.1 Gametime — Rounds & Turns
The passage of time experienced by the Characters is called ‘gametime’. This is distinct from the ‘real time’ experienced by the players. Gametime permits a slowing down of the Character’s actions into discrete periods called ‘rounds’, each representing 1 second (for intense action and combat) to 3 seconds (or more), depending upon the intensity of the activity engaged in.

During a round, each player will take one or more ‘turns’, during which they will spend Action Points permitting their Character(s) to act in the game. Consider the gametime spent during a turn to be a fraction of that encompassed by a round. When all of the players’ turns are completed (i.e., there are no more actions permitted or desired), the current round is over, and the next round begins.

5.2 Action Initiative
Before the game can begin, the players must determine the order in which the Characters’ actions are to occur during each round of gameplay. This is done via a comparison of Initiative Values.

A Character’s Initiative Value is equal to the sum of their Body Value + Mind Value. Record the Initiative Values of all the Characters to be included in the game from the highest to the lowest – this is the Initiative Order that will regulate the PC’s actions for each round. Those PCs with the same Initiative Values must roll 1d10; the higher number will act before the lower (but still above PCs with lower Initiative Values).

5.2.1 Passing Initiative
A Character whose turn it is to act in the Initiative order may choose to take no immediate action. This incurs no AP cost and effectively functions as a passing of their immediate opportunity to act on to the person with the next highest Initiative Value in the sequence. Once everyone has had a turn and their Initiative number comes around they may again choose to act or pass. If everyone else has acted and the Character who has passed is the only one left to act, they must then either act (spending AP as applicable) or agree that their Character takes no action for that entire round; the next round will then begin. (Note: see Rule Option: Defensive [Out of Turn] Attack, 11.1.)

5.2.3 NPC & NCF Initiative
When a Character encounters a Non-Player Character (NPC), e.g., a hostile creature, or a Non-Character Figure (NCF), e.g., a non-threatening citizen, the player must determine the Initiative Order of the NPC/NCF relative to their PC(s). Use the same method as PCs to determine the Initiative Value of the NPC/NCF (i.e., Body Value + Mind Value), then place the NPC/NCF in the initiative order after all others with the same or better Initiative Value but before those with a lower value.

5.3 Turn Sequence & Action Resolution
Each round of gameplay, every Character will take one or more turns, with turn sequence governed by the Initiative Order (see 5.2). When it is a player’s turn, they take the following steps:

1. Declare PC’s Intended Action
A Character can only attempt one Action per turn. A single ‘Action’ is any one type of activity (e.g., moving[any number of 1" squares or hexes, any direction within the capacity of the Character], a non-combat Action (e.g., throwing a rope, giving first aid, grasping an object, opening a door, etc., see Character Actions 5.4), one Attack attempt (see Combat, 6.0), or stopping (e.g., to look, listen, rest, declare an attack, etc.) – the actual duration of which may vary slightly relative to actions being performed by other players during that round.

Begin a new turn by declaring the single Action you wish your acting Character to attempt during that turn. Some Actions (e.g., basic movement) can be undertaken with certainty; other Actions (e.g., jumping a chasm), are less certain, these will require a successful Action Roll to accomplish (see step 4 below).

Alternatively, you may pass your Initiative for this turn to the next PC in the sequence at no AP cost; effectively your PC hesitates or remains still until your turn in the Initiative Order comes round again.

2. Spend Action Points (AP)
Each Action (movement or task attempt) has a specific Action Point Cost (see Action Point Cost Table, 5.4.1). Obstacles to movement such as difficult terrain (e.g., mud) or strong wind, will increase the AP cost of movement and/or functioning in a specific area.

To attempt your declared Action, your Character must have enough Action Points available to spend to accomplish it — if you do, subtract the appropriate number of AP from your available total.

If a Character does not have enough available AP to perform a desired Action, it should be assumed that they either do not have the personal strength, energy, and/or speed to accomplish the act that round. They must choose to attempt something else or wait the next round to act (when their AP has been replenished).

Activities or tasks that involve long sequences of repetitive actions (e.g., digging a hole) are dealt with by designating how much can be accomplished each round by having the Character spend all their available AP on the task. This represents a concentrated effort at an ongoing activity.

Scenario Option: if the PC’s Action is a movement, and it results in their entering a new game area with a width greater than or equal to 2", roll for a Random Encounter (see 8.7).

Establishing AP Costs for Unlisted Actions
A Character may attempt any Action not specifically listed in the Action Cost Table. Consider an AP cost for the desired Action as follows: since each round of activity in GRIT is equal to approximately 1 to 3 seconds of gametime, apply a cost of 1 AP per less than or equal to 3 seconds of time that you estimate a typical person, under normal condition, would take to accomplish the Action.

Once All AP Are Spent
When all a Character’s AP are spent, no further Actions can be attempted that round.

3. Apply any Applicable Action (Combat) Roll Modifiers
Before making an Action Roll to attempt a task, all players may suggest Action (Combat) Roll Modifiers — in the form of a positive or negative number applied toward the Action Value (i.e., Stat Value or Skill Value) of the active player (see 11.5). Modifiers should reflect the current environmental, physical, and mental conditions impacting upon the PC’s action attempt (e.g., visibility poor: –3; attacker morale ‘eager’: +1).

If playing without a Gamemaster (who normally would make a final judgment as to the number and strength of the Modifiers suggested), apply no more than 3 negative modifiers for any 1 positive modifier; each player suggested modifier may possess a value ranging from +/– 1 to 3. If there is a dispute over the application of a modifier, the players in dispute will each roll 1d10; highest die decides. Once all accepted modifiers are factored in and a final value has been determined, the active player makes an Action Roll.

Unskilled Action/Attack Roll Penalty: if all players agree prior to the start of the game to use Skills for their Characters, whenever a Character attempts any unfamiliar act requiring an Action/Attack Roll (e.g., to translate a foreign hieroglyph, or use a weapon or device that they didn’t begin the scenario with) a –3 modifier is applied to the applicable Stat Rolled against. If successful, the next time the same Action/Attack is made the modifier applied is –2; the third time –1, where it remains until the player acquires the Skill for the Character (see 8.7).

4. If Required, Make an Action Roll (1d10)
While some actions can be accomplished under normal conditions without any chance of failure (e.g., walking across a flat surface), certain terrain, environmental, and situational conditions, or simply the nature of the task will impose a chance of failure (e.g., slippery floor, rainstorm, being chased). When this occurs, the player is required to make a die roll to simulate the chance that they may not succeed in their Action attempt. Most of the die rolls in GRIT will have individual names specific to the type of Action they represent (e.g., Body Roll, Mind Roll, Mystic Roll, Attack Roll, Skill Roll, Morale Check, Detection Check, etc.), however, all are considered to beAction Rolls.

The objective when making an Action Roll is to roll 1d10 equal to or less than an established value or target number (e.g., Body Value, Skill Value, Current Morale Value). The number rolled will determine whether the Character was successful in their Action attempt and occasionally may provide for some additional results or effects.

5. The Character Acts
If the Action Roll is successful (or if the Action required no Action Roll), do whatever is necessary to implement the Action (e.g., move the miniature on the gameplay surface, record any necessary information on the miniature’s Character Sheet).

6. End of Turn
Having completed your Character’s single Action for this turn, your turn is now over. The next player begins their turn (at step 1). If your Character has any AP remaining, the next time your Initiative number comes around in the Initiative Order, it will be your turn again.

The End of a Round
When each player has either a) spent all of their Character’s AP (often taking each player several turns) or b) chosen to do no more that round, a new round is declared — AP totals are replenished to their normal levels. AP cannot be saved or carried over from one round to the next.

5.4 Character Actions
To perform an Action a Character spends Action Points (AP). During each round, each Character on their turn takes one action in the established Initiative Order until all Action Points have been spent or all players have decided to perform no further actions that round. A single ‘action’ is any one type of activity (e.g. moving [any number of squares, any direction], one attack attempt, or stopping[to look, listen, rest, declare an attack, etc.].

If a specific action is not listed, simply apply a cost of 1 AP per less than or equal to 3 seconds of time that you estimate a typical person, under normal condition, would take to accomplish the Action.

5.3.1 Action Point Costs Table
Basic Movements (Directional) Action . Action Point (AP) Costs, Required Rolls & Effects
Remain Still (Watch, Wait, Listen, Hide, Rest, Pass Initiative) .. 0 AP
90° Turn (while moving or not) .. 0 AP
180° Turn (2 x 90° — while moving or not) .. 1 AP
Forward, Straight, Upright (per 1" square [5']) .. 1 AP
Forward, Diagonal, Upright (per 1" square [5']) .. 2 AP
Sideways, Upright (per 1" square [5']) .. 1 AP
Backwards, Straight, Upright (per 1" square [5']) .. 2 AP
Backwards, Diagonal, Upright (per 1" square [5']) .. 3 AP

Sit, Kneel, Squat, Drop Prone (‘Hit the dirt!’) .. 1 AP (Body Roll: success = +1 Dodge Roll Bonus; failure = –1 HP)
Rise from Kneeling, Squat, Sitting (e.g., chair) Position .. 1 AP
Rise from Prone or Ground Sitting Position .. 2 AP
Forward, Straight, Crawl/Roll/Slide (per 1" [5'] square) .. 2 AP (Body Roll: success = +2 Dodge Roll Bonus; failure = –2 HP)
Forward, Diagonal, Crawl/Roll/Slide (per 1" [5'] square) .. 3 AP (Body Roll: success = +2 Dodge Roll Bonus; failure = –2 HP)
Sideways, Crawl/Roll/Slide (per 1" [5'] square) .. 2 AP (Body Roll: success = +2 Dodge Roll Bonus; failure = –2 HP)
Backwards, Straight, Crawl/Roll/Slide (per 1" [5'] square) .. 3 AP (Body Roll: success = +2 Dodge Roll Bonus; failure = –2 HP)
Backwards, Diagonal, Crawl/Roll/Slide (per 1" [5'] square) .. 4 AP (Body Roll: success = +2 Dodge Roll Bonus; failure = –2 HP)

Forward, Straight, Up/Down a Steep Grade or Hill (per 1" square [5']) .. 2 AP
Forward, Diagonal,Up/Down a Steep Grade or Hill (per 1" square [5']) .. 3 AP
Sideways, Up/Down a Steep Grade or Hill (per 1" square [5']) .. 2 AP
Backwards, Straight, Up/Down a Steep Grade or Hill (per 1" square [5']) .. 3 AP
Backwards, Diagonal, Up/Down a Steep Grade or Hill (per 1" square [5']) .. 4 AP
Jump Down: Vertical/Steep Surface
(e.g. wall, ditch, pit, etc.; per less than or equal to 1" [5'] square)
.. 1 AP (if distance [feet] > Body Value, make a Body Roll:
failure = fall prone: lose 1 HP/5' fallen)
Jump Up: Vertical/Steep Surface
(e.g. High jump, wall, ditch, etc.; per less than or equal to 1" [5'] square)
.. 2 AP (if distance [feet] > Body Value, make a Body Roll:
failure = fall prone: lose 1 HP/5' fallen)
Jump Across
(e.g. Long jump, ditch, chasm, pit, etc.; per less than or equal to 1" [5'] square)
.. 3 AP (if distance [feet] > Body Value, make a Body Roll:
failure = fall prone: lose 1 HP/5' fallen)
Climb Up or Down: Vertical/Steep Surface:
(e.g., wall, cliff, etc.; per 1" square [5'])
.. 4 AP (3 with rope); Roll 1d10: ‘10’ = fall prone: lose 1 HP per less than or equal to 5' fallen. Body Value = max. ft climbed/round.
Mount/Dismount an Animal or Vehicle .. 1 AP; if unbroken requires Body Roll: failure = fall, lose 1 HP.
Swim (any direction), (per 1" [5'] square) .. 5 AP

Combat & Related Physical Actions .. Action Point (AP) Costs, Required Rolls & Effects
Declare an Attack: Draw, Ready, Point Weapon. .. 1 AP
Melee Attack: Armed Combat. .. AP Cost and effects depend upon weapon used, see 4.1.
Melee Attack: Unarmed Combat. .. 1 AP (1d10 ÷ 2 HP Damage)
Melee Attack: Unarmed Combat,
Martial Arts Skill Bonus.
.. +1 HP Damage per each 1 AP spent in 1 turn.
Throw Item, Object, or Missile Weapon
(i.e., in combat)
.....If object less than or equal to 5 lbs:
.....If object 5 to 10 lbs:
.....
If object >10 lbs (to max Carry mass):
.. 1 AP
.....
Total distance = Body Value x 8" [40'];
Total distance = Body Value x 2" [10'];
Total distance = Body Value x 1" [5']
Aim Bonus: Firearm/Missile/Thrown Weapon. .. +1 Attack bonus per 1 AP spent, then make Body Roll to apply.
Stealth Attack: Peek & Shoot Around Corner (obstacle), Then Withdraw. .. 1 (Body Roll to perform stealthy, failure = observed)
Load or Unload Firearm/Missile Weapon. .. 5 AP
Un-jam a Jammed Firearm/Missile Weapon. .. 1 AP + Mind Roll = success
Dodge (Try to avoid a physical attack) .. 0 (Roll less than or equal to Half Body Value to Dodge, see 6.4)

Note: Many more Action Point Cost options are listed in the GRIT Advanced Rules — available now!.



6.0 Combat
There are two types of combat, range combat and melee combat. Range combat occurs when an attack is made with a weapon (or supernatural ability) that can propel damage-inducing projectiles (or forces) from the attacker to the target. Such weapons may include spears, bows, guns, missiles, or even magic. Melee combat occurs between Characters in adjacent 1" areas (squares/hexes, with miniatures base-to-base) unarmed or holding weapons with a range of 1". Melee weapons may include swords, daggers, maces, clubs, or a Character’s fists, claws, feet, tail, or teeth. Each specific weapon, unarmed combat style, or hand-held shield is considered a distinctSkill (other Skills and supernatural combat will be detailed in later GRIT supplements.)

6.1 Line-of-Sight (LOS)
Unless a Character intends to attempt a ‘Blind Attack’ on their opponent, with a high chance of failure, they must be able tosee an opponent before they can actually engage them. The total of what a Character can see is called their Line-of-Sight (LOS).

Characters using hand-held melee weapons must be adjacent to their target, so unless it is invisible, it will be in their LOS. Weapons with a range grater than or equal to 2" require that the attacker must be able to trace a straight line from their eyes to some part of their target’s body (or surface area if an object).

For initiated actions and aimed attacks consider a PC on foot to have a Line-of-Sight (LOS) forming a 90° frontal arc from their eyes. For reactionary, defensive actions, and passive observations on foot, consider the LOS to be a 180° frontal arc. Mounted PCs have a 180° frontal arc LOS for all actions. (To determine whether a Character can see a given target or thing, a piece of string or thread can be used.)

6.2 Getting Within Range
Once a target is in an attacker’s Line-of-Sight, they must then get ‘within Range’ before they can use their weapon. Each weapon will have its own specific Range, however, all hand-held melee weapons require that a Character be adjacent to their opponent (bases < 1", straight or diagonal, in front, to the side or behind) before they can be used. The use of a weapon is a Skill; if the Character does not possess the Weapon Skill for the weapon used, employ their Body Value for their Attack Roll.

6.3 Making an Attack
1. Initiative Order: A Character can only attempt a normal attack on their turn in the Initiative Order (see Action Initiative, 5.2,and Defensive Attack, 11.1). If engaged in an ongoing melee and after an attack your opponent is still standing, you must wait until your next turn in the Initiative Order before you may attack again (or retreat).

2. Weapon: On your Character’s turn, state the specific Weapon (Skill) or Unarmed Combat Skill, and/or magical resource(s) as applicable, to be used for the attack. If your game is not using Skills (a rule option, see 8.7), roll against the Character’s Body Value instead. If your game is using Skills but the Character does not possess a Skill for the weapon used see Unskilled Action/Attack Roll Penalty, 5.3.3.

If their weapon is not already in hand the Character must ready it (Cost: 1 AP).

Ammunition: For fast play ignore ammunition details; for realistic play keep track of the ammunition used and available. Ammunition may be carried between several PCs in a squad and shared as needed via various Actions (e.g., Carry, Hand-Over, etc.).

3. Move Within Range: Before an attack can occur, the intended opponent must be within Range of the Weapon used and in the Line of Sight of the attacker (unless making a ‘Blind Shot’: –5 penalty). If the opponent is not within range (e.g., they’ve retreated out of range) the attacker must advance to get within Range before they may attempt an attack, applying an Attack Roll Movement Penalty of –1 per 1" the attacker and/or target moved during theirprevious Action (see Combat (Action) Modifiers Table, 11.5). Alternatively, they may elect to wait until their next turn (or the next round) to attack without applying a movement penalty (unless the defender moves).

4. Attack Declaration: Once an attacker is within Range for the weapon they’re using they may declare their intent to attack. A Character need only declare their intent to attack once per melee (unless they have retreated).

5. Begin the Attack: If the Character is within Range, has declared their intent to attack, and has the necessary AP available, they may immediately attack — even if they have moved during the current turn — this is considered a ‘charge’. Note the Skill Value of the Weapon (or Unarmed Combat) Skill used.

6. Rule Option: Combat (Action) Modifiers: Apply any deemed applicable (see 11.5) to the PC’s Skill Value. If the resulting number is zero or negative, no attack is possible.

7. Make the >Attack Roll (Roll 1d10): if the number rolled is equal to or less than the PC’s >modified Skill Value (or Body Value if no Skill Value exists for the weapon used) the attack may have hit the target; if the number rolled is greater than the PC’s modified Skill Value the attack misses.

Critical Hit Success: If a ‘1’ is rolled, the attack is an automatic hit — no Dodge Roll is permitted.

Critical Miss Failure: If a ‘10’ is rolled, the attack is an automatic miss — no Dodge Roll is necessary. Also, the attacker is off balance and must spend an extra +1 AP for their current action (if possible; if no AP are available, subtract it from the AP for the next round).

6.4 The Defender Attempts to Dodge
While the attacker is trying to hit them, the defender attempts to roll 1d10 less than their Body Value and less than the number rolled by the attacker; this action costs zero AP and is called a Dodge Roll. If successful, the attacking blow misses them; if they fail, the attacking blow hits. Example: The defender has a Body Value of 6; the attacker makes a successful attack, rolling 3; the defender must roll 1 or 2 to successfully dodge the attack.

Critical Dodge Success: If a ‘1’ is rolled, the Dodge maneuver puts the defender in a more favorable position. With no AP cost applied, the defender may immediately move into the next 1" area (square/hex) adjacent to their current position — if available; this may include advancing upon or backing away from their attacker. Also, if the defender chooses to attack next turn, they may apply a +1 Attack Roll Modifier (see Making an Attack 6.3.6).

Critical Dodge Failure:If a ‘10’ is rolled, the hitting attack will inflict +1 extra HP Damage upon the defender.

6.5 Inflicting Damage
If the attacker successfully hits the defender (and the defender fails to Dodge), they will then determine the amount of Damage their assault inflicts upon their opponent (based on the specific weapon or unarmed combat mode, usually a function of a 1d10 Damage Roll plus modifiers, see Weapons 4.1).

6.5.1 Critical Damage Success and Failure
If a ‘10’ is rolled, a Critical Damage Success is designated; the defending Character must make a Body Roll; if they fail, the Character collapses (unless already prone).

If a ‘1’ is rolled, a Critical Damage Failure is designated; the attacking weapon (or limb) breaks. Broken melee and low-tech weapons do half normal damage; projectile weapons won’t function.

6.5.2 Applying Damage
Once the total amount of Damage is established, the defender then subtracts from the Damage total an amount equal to their Damage Resistance Value (see Armor 4.2).

If any Damage remains after this subtraction, it is applied to the defender — having gotten through the armor, temporarily reducing their HP total (until it can be replenished through rest). The result is recorded on the miniature’s Character Sheet. Example: 11 Damage – 5 Damage Resistance Value = 6 Damage.

6.5.3 Bruise Damage
For every 5 HP of Impact Damage that is absorbed by the defender’s armor, 1 HP is applied to the defender as Bruise Damage. This is in addition to any inflicted Damage that is not absorbed by the Character’s Damage Resistance Value (i.e., armor).

Example 1: 8 points of Damage are inflicted on a PC wearing armor with a DRV of 6; the armor absorbs 6 points of the Damage while 2 pass through as Impact Damage to the PC — plus an additional 1 point of Bruise Damage. Total actual Damage received: 3 HP.

Example 2: 12 points of Damage are inflicted on a PC wearing numerous protective garments with a total DRV of 20; the garments absorb all 12 points of Damage, however, 2 points of Bruise Damage are still inflicted.


Appendix: GRIT Character Templates

Provided below are some Character Templates reflecting specific heroic stereotypes (and a mount) which you may use directly or modify as you like. The total of all 6 Stat Values (Body, Mind, Mystic, Race, Action, Health) for any Character is 30. When receiving a direct physcial assault (during combat or otherwise), total the Character’s Damage Resistance Value (DRV) — typically granted through the wearing of armor or the carrying of a Shield — this will indicate their capability of resisting HP loss from the blow.

Basic Character Templates

Cunning Adventurer – Human
Primary Stats . Secondary Stats Initiative Order in Current Scenario & Notes
Body Value: .7 . Initiative Value: 14 .
Mind Value: .7 . Action Points: 8
Mystic Value: .1 . Health Points: 6
Race: Human: .1 . . .
Possessions
Armor 1: . Padded Garment: DRV: 8
Armor 2: . Scale Mail Armor: DRV: 22
Weapon 1: . Long Sword: 1 Attack/turn @ 2 AP, RNG: 1", Damage: 1d10+4 HP
Weapon 2: . Dagger, Throwing: 1 Attack/turn @ 1 AP, RNG: 2", Damage: 1d10+1 HP

Lucky Fighter – Human
Primary Stats . Secondary Stats Initiative Order in Current Scenario & Notes
Body Value: .7 . Initiative Value: 13 .
Mind Value: .5 . Action Points: 7
Mystic Value: .4 . Health Points: 6
Race: Human: .1 . . .
Possessions
Armor 1: . Heavy Fabric: DRV: 2
Armor 2: . Soft Leather: DRV: 8
Weapon 1: . Short Sword: 1 Attack/turn @ 1 AP, RNG: 1", Damage: 1d10+2 HP
Weapon 2: . Short Bow: 1 Attack/turn @ 2 AP, RNG: 60", Damage: 1d10+1 HP

Warrior Sage – Human
Primary Stats . Secondary Stats Initiative Order in Current Scenario & Notes
Body Value: 6 . Initiative Value: 12 .
Mind Value: .6 . Action Points: 7
Mystic Value: .6 . Health Points: 4
Race: Human: .1 . . .
Possessions
Armor 1: . Heavy Fabric: DRV: 3
Armor 2: . Quilted Garment: DRV: 12
Weapon 1: . Spear: 1 Attack/turn @ 2 AP, RNG: 1" Stab, 4" Throw, Damage: 1d10+2 HP
Weapon 2: . Sling: 1 Attack/turn @ 2 AP, RNG: 40", Damage: 1d10+1 HP

Physical Warrior – Human
Primary Stats . Secondary Stats Initiative Order in Current Scenario & Notes
Body Value: 8 . Initiative Value: 11 .
Mind Value: 3 . Action Points: 9
Mystic Value: 1 . Health Points: 8
Race: Human: .1 . . .
Possessions
Armor 1: . Padded Garment: DRV: 6
Armor 2: . Chainmail Armor: DRV: 44
Weapon 1: . Long Sword: 1 Attack/turn @ 2 AP, RNG: 1", Damage: 1d10+4 HP
Weapon 2: . Dagger: 1 Attack/turn @ 1 AP, RNG: 1", Damage: 1d10+1 HP

Physical Warrior – Dwarf
Primary Stats . Secondary Stats Initiative Order in Current Scenario & Notes
Body Value: 8 . Initiative Value: 11 .
Mind Value: 3 . Action Points: 7
Mystic Value: 1 . Health Points: 8
Race: Dwarf: .3 . . .
Possessions
Armor 1: . Padded Garment: DRV: 6
Armor 2: . Chainmail Armor: DRV: 44
Weapon 1: . Axe (2-Handed): 1 Attack/turn @ 3 AP, RNG: 1", Damage: 1d10+6 HP
Weapon 2: . Dagger: 1 Attack/turn @ 1 AP, RNG: 1", Damage: 1d10+1 HP

Stealthy Warrior – Elf
Primary Stats . Secondary Stats Initiative Order in Current Scenario & Notes
Body Value: 7 . Initiative Value: 13 .
Mind Value: 6 . Action Points: 7
Mystic Value: 2 . Health Points: 5
Race: Elf: .3 . . .
Possessions
Armor 1: . Soft Leather: DRV: 7
Armor 2: . Padded Garment: DRV: 6
Weapon 1: . Short Bow: 1 Attack/turn @ 1 AP, RNG: 60", Damage: 1d10 HP
Weapon 2: . Long Sword: 1 Attack/turn @ 2 AP, RNG: 1", Damage: 1d10+4 HP

Warhorse (Trained Mount)
Primary Stats . Secondary Stats Initiative Order in Current Scenario & Notes
Body Value: 8 . Initiative Value: 10 .
Mind Value: 2 . Action Points: 9
Mystic Value: 1 . Health Points: 9
Race: Human: .1 . . .
Possessions
Armor 1: . Padded Garment: DRV: 7
Armor 2: . Plate Armor: DRV: 55
Weapon 1: . Long Sword: 1 Attack/turn @ 2 AP, RNG: 1", Damage: 1d10+4 HP
Weapon 2: . Dagger: 1 Attack/turn @ 1 AP, RNG: 1", Damage: 1d10+1 HP




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